The Lincoln Roll – the Princes’ Death Certificate?

Interesting evidence in the mystery of what happened to the “Princes in the Tower.” I hadn’t thought to look at the Lincoln Roll in such a way!

The Henry Tudor Society

By David Durose

The Lincoln Roll – the Princes’ Death Certificate?

This article is about the family tree that belonged to John de la Pole, the Earl of Lincoln and what it says about the fate of the so-called Princes in the Tower – Edward V and his young brother Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York. It provides an approximate date for the death of Edward V and disproves the idea that either of the Princes might have survived. It also puts the actions of Lincoln, his younger brothers and Margaret of Burgundy in a new perspective.

While this new evidence supports the ‘traditional’ view held by most historians that Richard III ordered the killing of his nephews, it also completely revises the narrative provided by the various contemporary chroniclers and Thomas More. It supports a view of Lincoln – and by extension, his uncle Richard III – as ruthless…

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One response to “The Lincoln Roll – the Princes’ Death Certificate?

  1. Alan White

    Sadly, David Durose’s argument appears to have been based on mistakes in transcribing and translating the latin notes relating to Edward IV’s sons, Edward and Richard.

    (1) For Edward V, Durose transcribes the note as: “In iunie tute sine liberis decessit” Duroses’s translation: In June safely without issue deceased in childhood

    But the correct transcription seems to be: “In juventute sine liberis decessit”, which can be translated as, “The youth deceased without children”.

    (2) For Richard, Duke of York, Durose gives the correct transciption: “Etiam decessit sine liberis”. Again, his translation appears to be wrong: “Also deceased without issue in childhood” The translation could be simply written as: “Also deceased without children”.

    In other words, the chart says only that the two sons of Edward IV died without having children of their own to become their heirs, and gives no fresh indication of when Edward V may have died.

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